Faith in the paranormal is a sign of someone trusting their instincts, researchers say

It’s really creepy! Faith in the paranormal is a sign of someone trusting their instincts, researchers say

  • People who believe in the paranormal have a different way of thinking
  • Researchers say that those who believe in ghosts trust their gut feelings
  • Skeptics who don’t believe in the paranormal are likely to be more analytical

Those of us who believe in ghosts and things that flap in the night are no doubt used to being dismissed as gullible or naive.

But here’s something to cheer up: A study suggests that people who think the paranormal is real simply have a “different” style of thinking.

Researchers say those who believe in ghosts and the supernatural trust their instincts, while skeptics are more analytical.

Researchers say those who believe in ghosts and the supernatural trust their instincts, while skeptics are more analytical.

A team looked at 71 studies conducted over 40 years on people who believe in ghosts, clairvoyance and psychokinesis: moving objects only with thought

A team looked at 71 studies conducted over 40 years on people who believe in ghosts, clairvoyance and psychokinesis: moving objects only with thought

It means that, when faced with inexplicable phenomena, they are more likely to follow their instinctive feelings than to apply abstract reasoning to what they have seen.

A team looked at 71 studies conducted over 40 years on people who believe in ghosts, clairvoyance and psychokinesis, moving objects only with their thoughts.

The majority were contemptuous of believers as “uncritical and foolish”. But by applying modern understanding of psychology to the study results, the researchers were able to establish that the actual evidence was not so clearly conclusive.

It did not reveal intelligence deficiencies, but instead reflected people’s various ways of thinking.

The study authors found that “two out of three studies document that paranormal beliefs are associated with poorer cognitive performance.”

However, the team said “no specific profile of cognitive functioning for paranormal believers” emerged from the studies, which involved 20,993 participants between 1980 and 2020.

They argued that “the current studies do not necessarily support the view of a previous researcher, Harvey Irwin [in 2009]that “… the believer in the paranormal is considered in various ways illogical, irrational, gullible, uncritical and foolish”.

Lead researcher Charlotte Dean of the University of Hertfordshire said: “The difference between believers and skeptics seems to stem from the flexibility of their thinking styles and the way they approach new or abstract problems. It’s not that believers are less. intelligent It has to do with applying their problem-solving skills.

Skeptics tend to be characterized by an analytical style of thinking. If you give them an abstract problem, they think of all the different ways to solve it and choose the one that is most likely to work. Believers are characterized by an intuitive thinking style and follow their instincts. ‘

He added: “So if you come across an inexplicable phenomenon that could be expressed as new or abstract, they come to different conclusions regardless of whether it was paranormal or not.”

A 2017 survey asking adults if they believed in ghosts, ghouls, spirits and paranormal activity found that 33% were believers, 46% non-believers, and 21% undecided.

There was a spooky hand involved in winning this pair’s £ 3 million lotto

A couple who won £ 3.6 million in the national lottery used it to become professional ghost hunters.

Laura Hoyle and Kirk Stevens, 38, thought they only raised £ 5 at the Set for Life draw in March 2021 and continued playing for two weeks before being warned of their luck.

Now Miss Hoyle, 40, of Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, has quit her job to work as a paranormal investigator alongside Mr Stevens, a production engineer.

He said: “Kirk and I are participating in a lot of other paranormal activities and I’m editing the videos we do, which I love to do.

Laura Hoyle and Kirk Stevens, 38, thought they only raised £ 5 at the Set for Life draw in March 2021 and continued playing for two weeks before being warned of their luck.

Laura Hoyle and Kirk Stevens, 38, thought they only raised £ 5 at the Set for Life draw in March 2021 and continued playing for two weeks before being warned of their luck.

“Without the win, we wouldn’t have been able to tick off a huge bucket list item: visit Nottingham’s National Justice Museum after hours and spend time investigating there.”

Carpenter Stevens said, “I want to make paranormal investigation products using my woodworking and electronics skills.”

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